Tag Archives: David Tutera

How to Choose Your Wedding Colors

By: 
David Tutera

Ever since you announced your engagement, you’ve probably been repeatedly asked this question: "What is your wedding color scheme?" It is important, and it’s also one of the first questions I ask when I meet a bride. 

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Photo Credit: Marring Visuals

Color is actually an extension of you, as a bride, and the hues you choose will affect everything — from the ink and paper choices of your invitations to your bridesmaids' dresses to your bouquets and floral centerpieces to your tablecloths, your specialty cocktails and even your favors. And oh, yes, the cake!

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Photo Credit: Marring Visuals

OMG! This is a huge decision. So let’s step back a minute and think about color in everyday life. Color can create a mood and affect the energy of a space. When you paint a room in your home, the choice of color will evoke a feeling. Yellow is happy and exciting, and it makes me think of the morning sun, so I love it for a kitchen. Red is associated with passion and adventure, while blue is calming and peaceful. In my home everything is splashed with color — from a red kitchen to a purple bedroom, and everything in between. For some people that may be too much, but for me different colors create different experiences — and isn’t that what life is all about?

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Photo Credit: Marring Visuals

So color is a very personal choice, but when I ask brides about their color schemes, most tell me that they want all white or shades of pink. Now these are safe, but less daring than I’d like. My advice is, add personality — your personality — by choosing a splash of color. Together, consider your favorite colors as well as your season and style.

What do certain colors mean to each of you? (The pink of the peonies in your mom’s spring garden? The blue of the summer sky at the beach?) Now purchase inexpensive paints, brushes and paper and start splattering. Be a little crazy, a little Jackson Pollock! Or pick up paint chips at your local home improvement store, and play with different combinations. You might be surprised by what you both like.

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Photo Credit: Marring Visuals

Shades of the Seasons
I try to avoid color schemes that are too predictable. For example, a fall wedding that’s orange and brown makes me think of Halloween and pumpkins. "Harvest" colors are too clichéd; you don’t want your wedding to be too "themey." Instead, consider taupe or burgundy with copper and a hint of lavender. Fall is perfect for being fashion forward with unique colors.

Spring: Spring colors are usually all about pastels, but change it up a bit by adding deep splashes of plum or coral.

Summer: Go for bold yellows, purples, reds and blues. Or select different shades of a color: Coral, salmon and a deep burnt orange would be stunning.

Winter: All-white is gorgeous, but add a splash of lavender for warmth. Or go for a metallic, like pewter, silver, copper, bronze or gold, for depth and richness.

Your wedding is a blank canvas just waiting for you to paint it in your special colors. Have fun creating a masterpiece! 

David Tutera Reveals: The Highs and Lows of Planning a Wedding

By: 
David Tutera

wedding reception centerpieceLet the wedding planning begin! This should be one of the most enjoyable and creative processes you will ever experience. Yet many couples tell me they get so overwhelmed they feel as if they’ve taken on a second job they’ve had no training for. As for me, I started at 14, learning the craft of floral design while working at my grandfather’s flower shop. That’s where my journey began. I truly believe I was bound to create parties. Here, some of the planning aspects I love most — and least. Get the more difficult wedding elements under control and the rest should fall into place.

The Pros (What I Love):

Setting the vision: Getting a chance to dive in and understand what a couple is looking for and the style of the event they want to create is the all-important first step to a beautiful event. My television work makes it seem as though a super-specific theme for your wedding is mandatory, but please trust me when I say it is not. Themes are only great when it makes sense to the bride and groom. However, I do love when a couple knows the types of looks, colors, feelings and moods they want for their wedding. Ask yourself: What are your favorite...colors... historic eras...flowers....seasons? The answers to these questions will help you better envision the overall look of your wedding.

Flowers and décor: I love meeting with vendors and seeing the details come alive in all areas from invitations to flowers, colors and lighting. Invitations, for example, truly set the tone of the overall celebration to come. And flowers make the event literally come to life. A bride without a bouquet or a table without a centerpiece isn’t, to me, a wedding. Soft colors, bold colors or combinations of both work to create an overall style or even evoke a period in time. These visual components can be the most pleasurable parts of wedding planning.

Food and drink: It’s great to use food to tell the story of your culture and background, but take care not to get on the full-on foodie bandwagon when planning your wedding, incorporating too many exotic ingredients. When it comes to beverages, specialty drinks have been a major trend; newer are specialty bars featuring whiskey, champagne and/or wine. Any of these options can make your wedding more unique.

The element of surprise: I love the opportunity to make special moments happen: perhaps a dance that no one knew about or changing up the timeline. I always say that something different should happen every 30 minutes. This allows guests to become interactive participants vs. inactive participants following the same old routine (ceremony to cocktails to dinner) and results in something special. This is what I will always love about doing weddings.

The Cons (What I Don't Love)

Who's invited?: Determining the guest list can be a tough task, as can deciding the seating arrangements: who should sit next to whom. Once this gets set, the sailing will become much smoother, I promise! 

Too many cooks: You do not want a committee of opinions. Pick a few supportive friends and family members (three at the most) and trust in them to guide you and support you. The key word is support.

Travel logistics: Coordinating travel details for all your wedding guests can be mind-numbing, not to mention time-consuming. Instead of being the point person for travel questions, I suggest finding a good travel agent ahead of time (especially if you’re having a destination wedding!) who can handle these issues. It will be worth it if it means you now have time you would have otherwise lost to focus on the other important details of your day.

Details, details: Picking the perfect songs for your processional, recessional,first dance and all of your important formalities (e.g., toasts) can be challenging, since these elements require a final, set- in-stone decision — you want to make sure everything is exactly as you want it. These all-important nitty-gritty details can be a chore, but they are essential to get right.

Oversharing (especially on social media): One of my ground rules: Don’t forget that some parts of your wed- ding should surprise your guests, so don’t spill too many details ahead of time! 

Photo Credit: Michael Segal Photography

David Tutera Reveals: The Highs and Lows of Planning a Wedding

By: 
David Tutera

wedding reception centerpieceLet the wedding planning begin! This should be one of the most enjoyable and creative processes you will ever experience. Yet many couples tell me they get so overwhelmed they feel as if they’ve taken on a second job they’ve had no training for. As for me, I started at 14, learning the craft of floral design while working at my grandfather’s flower shop. That’s where my journey began. I truly believe I was bound to create parties. Here, some of the planning aspects I love most — and least. Get the more difficult wedding elements under control and the rest should fall into place.

The Pros (What I Love):

Setting the vision: Getting a chance to dive in and understand what a couple is looking for and the style of the event they want to create is the all-important first step to a beautiful event. My television work makes it seem as though a super-specific theme for your wedding is mandatory, but please trust me when I say it is not. Themes are only great when it makes sense to the bride and groom. However, I do love when a couple knows the types of looks, colors, feelings and moods they want for their wedding. Ask yourself: What are your favorite...colors... historic eras...flowers....seasons? The answers to these questions will help you better envision the overall look of your wedding.

Flowers and décor: I love meeting with vendors and seeing the details come alive in all areas from invitations to flowers, colors and lighting. Invitations, for example, truly set the tone of the overall celebration to come. And flowers make the event literally come to life. A bride without a bouquet or a table without a centerpiece isn’t, to me, a wedding. Soft colors, bold colors or combinations of both work to create an overall style or even evoke a period in time. These visual components can be the most pleasurable parts of wedding planning.

Food and drink: It’s great to use food to tell the story of your culture and background, but take care not to get on the full-on foodie bandwagon when planning your wedding, incorporating too many exotic ingredients. When it comes to beverages, specialty drinks have been a major trend; newer are specialty bars featuring whiskey, champagne and/or wine. Any of these options can make your wedding more unique.

The element of surprise: I love the opportunity to make special moments happen: perhaps a dance that no one knew about or changing up the timeline. I always say that something different should happen every 30 minutes. This allows guests to become interactive participants vs. inactive participants following the same old routine (ceremony to cocktails to dinner) and results in something special. This is what I will always love about doing weddings.

The Cons (What I Don't Love)

Who's invited?: Determining the guest list can be a tough task, as can deciding the seating arrangements: who should sit next to whom. Once this gets set, the sailing will become much smoother, I promise! 

Too many cooks: You do not want a committee of opinions. Pick a few supportive friends and family members (three at the most) and trust in them to guide you and support you. The key word is support.

Travel logistics: Coordinating travel details for all your wedding guests can be mind-numbing, not to mention time-consuming. Instead of being the point person for travel questions, I suggest finding a good travel agent ahead of time (especially if you’re having a destination wedding!) who can handle these issues. It will be worth it if it means you now have time you would have otherwise lost to focus on the other important details of your day.

Details, details: Picking the perfect songs for your processional, recessional,first dance and all of your important formalities (e.g., toasts) can be challenging, since these elements require a final, set- in-stone decision — you want to make sure everything is exactly as you want it. These all-important nitty-gritty details can be a chore, but they are essential to get right.

Oversharing (especially on social media): One of my ground rules: Don’t forget that some parts of your wed- ding should surprise your guests, so don’t spill too many details ahead of time! 

Photo Credit: Michael Segal Photography

Inside a Wedding-Planning Consultation with David Tutera

By: 
David Tutera

colorful wedding
Photo Credit: Michael Segal Photography

What Brides Ask David:

Q: How can I make my wedding different and unique?

A: It isn’t about trying to find a unique theme or concept that’s different because that doesn’t necessarily make sense for who you are as a couple. Instead, aim for a wedding that breaks the mold of the traditional formula and timeline that everyone else follows. Have some interactive participation so your guests can’t predict what’s around the corner, and they leave feeling like they experienced — experience is they key word here — something unique. Check out 150+ ways to make your wedding unforgettable ►

Q: Do I have to do all the expected formalities (e.g. first dance as husband and wife, father-daughter dance, mother-son dance, garter toss, bouquet toss, cake cutting)?

A: You don’t have to do any of it! It’s your wedding and it is completely up to you when it comes to these traditions. However, when making these decisions, take a moment to consider whether later in life you will regret not including them (e.g. having that special moment with your dad, your mom, etc.). Learn 10 ways to modernize classic wedding traditions ►

Q: Should we have an after-party or separate lounge area?

A: No. Both break the energy and flow of the celebration. Keep everyone contained in the four walls of one space and try not to spread out too much for too long a period of time.

Q: What are the season’s top color trends?

A: Rather than follow trends, try to pick colors that are unique to you, not specific to the colors of the moment. If you follow your heart and stay true to what’s meaningful and special to you and your fiancé, a beautiful wedding will unfold. Browse 200+ beautiful color-combinations for your wedding ►

Next: Find out what David Tutera likes to ask his brides ►

What David Asks His Brides:

escort card arrangementQ: What kind of wedding would you like to have?

A: The answer I often get is "I want a unique, different, creative wedding" — which is not the answer I am looking for. Every bride wants something unique; I want to see how far outside the box the couple wants to go. The style and personality they want to come through are important, but I need to understand how far they’re willing to venture — and how much they’re willing to break with the formula of a traditional wedding.

Q: What’s your color scheme?

A: Surprise: A lot of my brides don’t have a ready answer. Think about specific colors, preferably bringing in fabric swatches, paint chip colors, magazine tear sheets — anything that depicts what you’re envisioning. Ideally, I like to see three color choices per palette: a primary color (your main color), a secondary color (your accent color) and a third color (what I call the finish color: silver, crystal, copper or gold). See David's favorite color combos 

Q: How would you like to infuse your personalities into your celebration?

A: I hope the couple answers by telling me more about who they are — the types of foods they love, their cultural backgrounds, stories about their relationship, where they met, etc. The reason I ask this is because I want to tell the couple’s story. The more personality and detail in your wedding, the more your wedding becomes your wedding, instead of the cookie-cutter format so many people tend to follow. Check out 50+ creative ways to personalize your wedding ►

Q: What style do you live your life in?

A: Are you Modern? Classic? Eclectic? Traditional? Retro? I ask this question because the answer gives me a sense of who you are as a couple, as well as the way you like to live.

Q: What style would you like your wedding to be executed in?

A: The style a couple wants for their wedding may not be the style they live their lives by. It’s often more of a fantasy they want to live out for that day. Find the perfect theme for your wedding ►

Photo Credit: Maring Visuals

A Day in the Life of David Tutera

By: 
David Tutera

David Tutera's Daily Schedule:


Photo Credit: WETV

5:45 a.m. My alarm used to wake me up, but now it’s Cielo, my daughter, or Lucy, my rescue dog. 

5:50 a.m. Feed and change Cielo. 

6:15 a.m. Head downstairs to feed and walk Lucy. 

7:00 a.m. Turn on the coffee maker (this used to be the first thing I did, now it’s the thing I’m lucky to even get to). 

7:05-7:30 a.m. Begin checking e-mails. This used to happen exactly at 7:00, but now that I’m a parent, it’s anywhere between 7 and 7:30.

8:00 a.m. On my 2nd, 3rd or 4th cup of coffee.

8:30 a.m. Get ready to go to boxing, the gym, running or Pilates, depending on the day. 

8:45 a.m. Call mom in New York — every day. 

9:00 a.m. Work out. 

10:00 a.m. Drive home/pick up Starbucks. 

10:15 a.m. Call the New York office to check in on my East Coast staff and discuss any upcoming projects. 

10:30 a.m. Get caught up on what’s happening for the day with my assistant, Renee. 

11:25 a.m. Check in on Cielo.

11:30 a.m. I begin shooting “David Tutera: Unveiled,” meeting with my event coordinators, both in person and virtually, to discuss venues, fashion selections, as well as details of the filming of each episode. 

12:00 p.m. Cielo is brought to be on set with me. 

1:00 p.m. Before Cielo arrived, every lunch was a working lunch that consisted of brand partner meetings and calls to discuss new collections and product lines (among them, David Tutera for Mon Cheri gowns, craft line Down the Aisle in Style and online wedding planning program David Tutera Wedding Planners). Now, with Cielo in my life, lunch is split between play time and time with my brand partners.

2:00 p.m. Back on set and I am now on my third Starbucks venti quad iced cappuccino of the day.

5:30 p.m. Filming comes to an end. Go home and change.

6:00 p.m. Daddy time with Cielo! This includes: bath, putting her in pjs, feeding her, reading her a different story every night and tucking her in.

8:00 p.m. Out to a dinner meeting.

9:30 p.m. Drive home after dinner.

11:00 p.m. Bedtime — hopefully. My life is now ruled by Cielo, so if she wakes up and needs to be fed or changed, my bedtime is over!

Next: 7 Wedding-Planning Rules for Brides ►

Tips for Brides:

1. Once you’re engaged, it’s imperative to create a planning timeline and to be punctual for tastings, site inspections, vendor meetings… and especially when you walk down the aisle.

2. You don’t want to jeopardize your day job, so have your planning to-do list prepped the night before, then stick to planning duties only during off-times such as over your morning coffee and/or during your lunch hour. You should only be moonlighting as a wedding planner — it should not replace your full-time career.

3. It’s so important to stay in touch with family and friends while planning a wedding, but a balance should be struck between what is necessary to share and what is TMI — not everyone needs to hear every last detail of your wedding planning journey.

4. Working out helps anyone stay sane, motivated and focused, especially when planning a wedding.

5. Don’t plan your wedding every day — you will become burned out and it will no longer be enjoyable. 

6. Please, I beg you, do not talk about your wedding with your co-workers every day. They will get annoyed hearing about it constantly. Pick just three family members or friends to be your wedding committee with whom you discuss your planning details.

7. Don’t make every hour of every weekend with your fiancé center on your wedding. Remember to still take the time to enjoy each other.

7 Hot Color Palettes

David Tutera, star of WEtv’s “My Fair Wedding,” shares his favorite wedding palettes.
By: 
David Tutera
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Choosing a color scheme isn’t just about picking a color; it’s about setting a style. Where does color first get infused? It starts out with color in the invitations, the color of the bridesmaid dresses, the embellishments for the groomsmen, the tablecloths, the flowers, the cake and, ultimately, the lighting. What does color do? It sets a tone, a mood and an energy.

I’ve always said you should not go beyond three colors: any more than that can result in a look that’s a little too juvenile or circuslike. So either pick three different colors or variations of one overall color — if the latter is the case, you can have more than three shades (e.g. five or seven shades of blue).

Here are some of my favorite color palettes:

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6 Surprising Lessons David Tutera Learned From His Brides

David Tutera, star of WEtv’s “My Fair Wedding,” shares some lessons he’s learned from planning weddings for the past 25 years.
By: 
David Tutera
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david tutera and bride michelle pierce on location in los angeles

After over 25 years, I can say that there are some universal truths when it comes to working with brides. Feeling overwhelmed? You’re not alone. Almost every bride is suffering from nonstop information overload (now more than ever), which can lead to a place of confusion.

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Planning a Winter Wonderland Wedding

David Tutera, star of WEtv’s “My Fair Wedding,” shares his best ideas for an ultra-stylish seasonal wedding.
By: 
David Tutera
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For many of us, winter really is the most magical time of the year. So holding your wedding during this season just adds to the celebratory feel. And the opportunities for making a stylish statement are vast: Winter weddings can really run the gamut from all-white fêtes that sparkle with crystals and faux snow to country-cabin chic made cozy with plaids and branches. Start with these tips and let your imagination soar.

Your Paper Trail
Set the tone with your stationery. Paper with a sheen echoes the look of a blanket of fresh snow, while handmade card stock with jagged edges is a perfect nod to an Aspen-inspired celebration. When it comes to embellishments (on invitations, place cards and more), consider self-adhesive crystals, antique lace or plaid flannel bellybands or nature-inspired accents like small twigs or faux snowflakes.

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Wedding Style: Then and Now

David Tutera, star of WEtv’s “My Fair Wedding,” muses on wedding planning yesterday….and today.
By: 
David Tutera
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What do Rita Wilson, Michael J. Fox, Ellen Barkin and Kevin Bacon have in common? They all had weddings 25 years ago! Not only have some of their marriages gone through changes, so have nuptials overall. Weddings used to be very safe and for the most part, traditional — AKA boring! Gone are the days of super-traditional weddings with no personality or elements of surprise. Today’s couples are thinking outside the box, as they should. Breaking the rules doesn’t mean there still isn’t a formula to follow, but rather more opportunities to add your own personal style.

wedding dresses
Photo Credits: Anthony North (left); Jennifer Robbins (right)

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